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Man Who Injured State Trooper Surrenders

Published on Wednesday, January 24, 2007
in the WPLG News

BROWARD COUNTY, Fla. -- A man accused of slamming his pickup truck into a Florida Highway Patrol trooper’s cruiser, seriously injuring him last year, turned himself in on Wednesday.

Robert Dimmie Jr. is charged with two counts each of driving under the influence with serious bodily injury and DUI with property damage, and one count of DUI with injury.

Dimmie had been sought by the Florida Highway Patrol since the state attorney’s office of Broward County filed the arrest warrants Jan. 12.

One year ago Monday, trooper Darryl Haywood Jr. pulled over a motorist on Florida's Turnpike and was in his patrol cruiser when Dimmie's pickup truck veered onto the shoulder and rammed it from behind. The impact pushed the patrol car into a Hyundai that Haywood had just pulled over.

Haywood suffered a severe concussion and has not returned to duty.

Haywood's father was killed in October 2004 when his cruiser crashed into a tree on Interstate 4 in Volusia County. He was trying to stop a speeding motorcyclist when a tire on his cruiser blew out.

Haywood Jr. is the youngest person to become a state trooper. He was 20 at the time of the crash.

Dimmie was being held at the Broward County jail.

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Man wanted in highway crash arrested

The man wanted for crashing into a Florida Highway Patrol cruiser -- leaving a trooper with a serious brain injury -- has been arrested.

Published on Wednesday, January 24, 2007
in the Miami Herald

Robert F. Dimmie Jr., 23, was arrested today, according to jail records. FHP officials have said they planned to charge him with five counts of DUI.

Dimmie was arrested one day after FHP asked the public for help finding him.

He was wanted for a January 2006 crash on Florida's Turnpike just south of Hollywood Boulevard. Trooper Darryl Haywood Jr. had stopped to help a driver with a burned-out traffic light, FHP said.

Dimmie came speeding down the road in a pickup truck, slamming into Haywood's cruiser and trapping Haywood inside, FHP said.

Dimmie had minor injuries. He was taken to a local hospital and given toxicology tests, according to FHP.

Dimmie stayed in contact with police. But after the state attorney's office filed warrants for his arrest, Dimmie disappeared, FHP said.

Investigators couldn't find him. They reached Dimmie on his cellphone, but he wouldn't turn himself in.

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Hit-and-run driver surrenders to police, a year after trooper accident

Published on Wednesday, January 24, 2007
in the WSVN TV News

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (WSVN) -- Authorities say the man who fled the scene of an accident after crashing into a police cruiser on the side of the road has surrendered to police.

Police officially charged 23-year-old Robert Dimmie Jr. with DUI and hit-and-run Wednesday. Dimmie does not deny that he crashed his pickup truck into state trooper Darryl Haywood, 20, as he sat in his police cruiser on the Florida Turnpike at Sunrise Boulevard in the early morning of Jan. 22, 2006. Dimmie neglected to observe the Move-over Law when he nearly killed Haywood while the trooper made a routine traffic stop.

An arrest warrant was issued for Dimmie, and, authorities say, he was supposed to turn himself in two weeks ago. "In responding to various addresses that we've obtained on his possible whereabouts, he was not there. Upon speaking to him we have not been able to get him to turn himself in or contact us," said Lt. Roger Reyes of the Florida Highway Patrol.

However, Dimmie's lawyer says his client was not aware that police were looking for him. "He did not know he was being sought until a few days ago, and that's why he came to speak to me, and I spoke to the trooper that was investigating the case," said attorney Michael Milchman.

Fourteen months before Haywood's accident, his father, trooper Darryl Haywood Sr. was killed in a high speed chase in Orlando. Haywood, who is still off the job because of his accident, says his father would be happy with the way this case turned out. "My dad would definitely be happy about the whole situation, especially the fact that [Dimmie] turned himself in," he said.

Milchman also said Dimmie did not mean to hurt anyone. He is remorseful and also apologized to Haywood. "Knowing that I came that close to hurting somebody," Dimmie said. "I'm sorry I have caused you this, it was an accident. You know, it was a terrible accident at that."

Dimmie is being held at the Broward County jail on several DUI charges. He has four previous DUI arrests, two that injured two people and two that caused property damage. Dimmie's lawyer said his client was not drunk the night he crashed into Haywood's cruiser; he said he simply fell asleep at the wheel.

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Suspect sought in crash that injured trooper

Published on Wednesday, January 24, 2007
in the Miami Herald

It was nearly one year ago that a pickup truck rear-ended Trooper Darryl Haywood Jr.'s police cruiser, leaving him with a serious brain injury.

Now, the Florida Highway Patrol has an arrest warrant for a suspect believed to be responsible for the crash. And they want him to turn himself in. Robert Frederick Dimmie Jr., 23, is charged with five counts of DUI, according to the FHP.

Although detectives have been in touch with the Fort Lauderdale man, they say he refuses to come forward.

''We lost our patience,'' said Lt. Roger Reyes, an FHP spokesman. ``We tried to cooperate and work with him, but he chose to go this direction.''

Crime Stoppers is offering a $1,000 reward for any information leading to Dimmie's arrest.

The crash happened in January 2006 on the turnpike just south of Hollywood Boulevard. Haywood had stopped to help a motorist with a burned-out light when Dimmie came speeding down the road, FHP officials said.

The impact trapped Haywood in his cruiser.

Haywood, whose father also was a Florida Highway Patrol trooper killed in the line of duty, spent months recovering from the accident.

Dimmie suffered minor injuries. He was taken to a local hospital and given toxicology tests, according to the FHP.

Dimmie stayed in contact with police. But after the state attorney's office filed warrants for his arrest, Dimmie disappeared. Investigators were not able to find him at a handful of possible residences, Reyes said.

''We reached him on his cellphone, but he wouldn't turn himself in,'' Reyes said. ``He kept saying he would call us next week.''

That call never came.

Anyone with information is urged to call Crime Stoppers at 954-493-8477 or the Florida Highway Patrol at 561-640-2835.

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FHP Seeks Man Who Injured State Trooper

Published on Tuesday, January 23, 2007
in the WPLG News

PLANTATION, Fla. -- The Florida Highway Patrol held a news conference Tuesday asking for the public's help in finding a man who is accused of slamming his pickup truck into a trooper's patrol cruiser, seriously injuring him last year.

Robert Dimmie Jr. is charged with two counts each of driving under the influence with serious bodily injury and DUI with property damage, and one count of DUI with injury.

Ever since the state attorney's office of Broward County filed the arrest warrants Jan. 12, Dimmie has been nowhere to be found.

"We've been unable to locate Mr. Dimmie by responding to various addresses that we've obtained on his possible whereabouts," FHP Lt. Roger Reyes said.

One year ago Monday, trooper Darryl Haywood Jr. pulled over a motorist on Florida's Turnpike and was in his patrol cruiser when Dimmie's pickup truck veered onto the shoulder and rammed it from behind. The impact pushed the patrol car into a Hyundai that Haywood had just pulled over.

Haywood suffered a severe concussion and has not returned to duty.

Haywood's father was killed in October 2004 when his cruiser crashed into a tree on Interstate 4 in Volusia County. He was trying to stop a speeding motorcyclist when a tire on his cruiser blew out.

Haywood Jr. is the youngest person to become a state trooper. He was 20 at the time of the crash.

Broward Crime Stoppers has offered a reward of up to $1,000 for information that leads to Dimmie's arrest. He is believed to be in the tri-county area.

Anyone with information is asked to call Broward Crime Stoppers at 954-493-TIPS or Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS.

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Move over for safety

Published on Sunday, March 19, 2006
in the Gainesville Sun

Last Monday, Micanopy firefighter Denise Roberts was assisting injured people at the scene of an accident on I-75 when she was struck by a minivan and ended up an accident victim herself.

"I didn't quite make it over the guardrail in time," Roberts, who suffered contusions and a minor concussion, told The Sun.

Unfortunately, collisions between emergency workers and motorists are too often an occupational hazard. Between 1996 and 2000 alone, motorists in Florida crashed into law-enforcement and rescue vehicles that were stopped beside the roadways - with their warning lights flashing -1,793 times. The result: five deaths and 419 injuries.

Those statistics prompted passage of the Move Over Act. It has two basic provisions:

  • On highways with two or more lanes traveling in the same direction, when a law-enforcement or emergency vehicle is stopped by the roadside with emergency lights on, motorists must move out of the lane closest to the stopped vehicle as soon as it is safe to do so unless otherwise directed by an officer.
  • When emergency vehicles are stopped on a two-lane road, drivers must slow to 20 mph. If the posted speed limit is 20 mph or less, motorists must slow to 5 mph.

But many motorists still haven't gotten the message. During a recent three-hour roadside emergency drill, Miramar Police officers reportedly stopped 150 vehicles for failure to move over.

Law enforcement agencies are planning a crackdown on such errant motorists. Violators will be fined and three points assessed against their driving record.

Last month, Broward County Sheriff's Deputy Ryan Seguin, 23, was killed when he was struck by a passing vehicle while conducting a traffic stop on Interstate 595. In January, Trooper Darryl Haywood Jr. was hit and sustained serious head injuries while writing a ticket just south of Hollywood on the Florida Turnpike. More recently, Donald Bradshaw, 66, who helped stranded motorists as part of the Florida Department of Transportation's Road Rangers program, was run down and killed as he was placing cones to close a lane blocked by a wrecked car on Interstate 275 near downtown Tampa.

A Florida Highway Patrol spokesman told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel that the Move Over Act is basically a matter of "paying attention. If there is a lane open, move over or slow down. You can see the lights from far away, so start preparing and start looking to see if a lane is available."

Law-enforcement officers and emergency workers have a difficult and dangerous job. Motorists can make it a little safer by moving over on multiple-lane roads or slowing down on two-lane roads.

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Move Over for Roadside Safety

Published on Tuesday, March 14, 2006
in the Lakeland Ledger

Between 1996 and 2000, motorists in Florida crashed into law-enforcement and rescue vehicles that were stopped beside the roadways -- with their warning lights flashing -1,793 times.

Those crashes resulted in five deaths and 419 injuries.

Those statistics prompted the Legislature to pass the Move Over Act in 2002. It has two basic provisions:

  • On highways with two or more lanes traveling in the same direction, when a law-enforcement or emergency vehicle is stopped by the roadside with emergency lights on, motorists are required to move out of the lane closest to the stopped vehicle as soon as it is safe to do so unless otherwise directed by an officer.

  • On a two-lane road, when police cars, ambulances, wreckers and other vehicles are stopped by the road with lights flashing, drivers must slow to a speed 20 mph less than the speed limit. If the speed limit is 20 mph or less, motorists must slow to 5 mph.

Many motorists still haven't gotten the message, although there have been some educational campaigns. A spokesman for the Miramar Police Department told the South Florida Sun Sentinel last week that about 90 percent of the drivers don't know about the law.

The Miramar department, he added, had begun a monthlong awareness campaign, starting w ith a weeklong education program. In three hours, the department stopped 150 vehicles during a mock roadside emergency. The drivers were given informational fliers instead of tickets -- and warned that the enforcement would be coming this month.

The Miramar Police Department, along with the Florida Highway Patrol and other law-enforcement agencies, evidently has decided that word-of-mouth among drivers will raise awareness: Crackdowns on motorists who don't slow down the required 20 mph on two-lane roads, or don't move over on roads with four or more lanes are beginning statewide.

Violators will be fined and three points assessed against their driving record.

Needless tragedies abound. Last month, Broward County Sheriff's Deputy Ryan Seguin, 23, was killed when he was struck by a passing vehicle while conducting a traffic stop on Interstate 595.

The day after Seguin was killed, FHP Trooper Adam M. Heinlein was in his cruiser, parked along U.S. 27, south of Polk County, when a tractor-trailer sideswiped it. He was uninjured, but the violator the trooper had stopped was sprayed with shattered glass and had to be taken to a hospital.

In January, Trooper Darryl Hayood Jr. was hit while writing a ticket just south of Hollywood on the Florida Turnpike. A pickup truck veered into the rear of Haywood's cruiser, pinning him in the car for a half hour. He is recovering from serious head injuries.

A week ago Sunday, Donald Bradshaw, 66, who helped stranded motorists as part of the Florida Department of Transportation's Road Rangers program, was killed when he was placing cones to close a lane blocked by a wrecked car on Interstate 275 near downtown Tampa. A car driven by Benjamin J. Green, 31, drove through the lane closure and hit him.

Officially known as the Service Patrol Highway Assistance Program, Road Rangers assist stranded motorists along designated Florida highways. The program began in October 1995 in Broward and Collier counties, where FHP troopers reported that waiting with stranded motorists was taking up more than half their duty time. "The Road Rangers," said an FHP spokesman, "have returned our troopers to the highways where they belong."

Two Range Riders patrol Polk County's 29.5-mile section of Interstate 4 -- 24 hours a day, seven days a week -- from Memorial Boulevard in Lakeland to the Osceola County line. The uniformed rangers assist motorists with minor mechanical repairs, help with changing flats and provide gas for those who run out. George Williams of Davenport, a retired police captain, supervises about two dozen Road Rangers in Polk County, says to a DOT news release.

The Polk County service is contracted through Naples-based Coastland Auto Center. The company was the first to contract with the Road Rangers when the program began in 1995, and also provides services along Alligator Alley in South Florida and the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, south of St. Petersburg.

An FHP spokesman told the Sun-Sentinel that the Move Over Act is basically a matter of "paying attention. If there is a lane open, move over or slow down. You can see the lights from far away, so start preparing and start looking to see if a lane is available."

Law-enforcement officers and emergency workers have a difficult and dangerous job. Motorists can make it a little safer by moving over on multiple-lane roads or slowing down on two-lane roads.

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Drivers unaware of `move over' law

Police, firefighters need protection

Published on Sunday, March 12, 2006
in the Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel

On Alert, an occasional Sunday series, highlights public safety issues or features a recent incident.

Many drivers aren't aware of a law designed to protect emergency workers stopped alongside the state's roadways almost four years after it was approved by the state Legislature.

Recent incidents, including the death of Broward Sheriff's Deputy Ryan Seguin, who was struck by a car as he made a routine traffic stop along Interstate 595 last month, resulted in the latest public awareness campaign.

"It's an effort to get the word out to the public," said Officer Bill Robertson, a spokesman for the Miramar Police Department, which launched a monthlong project to educate drivers. "The educational portion will continue for the next week and then comes the enforcement."

The Florida Highway Patrol and the Sheriff's Office have conducted similar campaigns.

The law requires drivers to either move over one lane or slow down to 20 miles per hour below the posted speed limit when an emergency vehicle with flashing lights is stopped on the side of a highway or street. Emergency vehicles include police cars, ambulances, fire trucks, road maintenance vehicles, tow trucks, road ranger trucks and wreckers with rotating or flashing amber lights.

Violators can be fined with a moving violation and get three points on their license and potentially hurt people stopped on the roadside.

Along Miramar Parkway, officers recently watched to see whether drivers complied with the law when a patrol car was stopped on the side of the road during a staged traffic stop.

In three hours, they stopped 150 vehicles, including two Miramar city vehicles and a marked fire inspector vehicle from another agency. Drivers were informed of the law and given an informational flier rather than a ticket.

About 90 percent of the drivers did not know about the law, Robertson said.

Miramar resident Flor Cabutto thought she was being pulled over for speeding or a checkpoint.

"This is the first time I'm hearing about it," said Cabutto, who was visibly happy she was not being cited. "It makes sense; I am going to tell my husband."

Some drivers told officers that they thought the law was only for major highways. Others said they thought that they had pulled over enough or that they didn't have an opportunity to move over.

The excuses will get them nowhere once Miramar starts issuing tickets the week of March 20.

There have been no injuries or deaths to officers making stops or directing traffic in Miramar, but there have been some near misses. Robertson hopes the campaign will raise awareness among drivers.

"This is helping to protect officers not just for our department but other state and other local officials," he said.

There have been a number of recent incidents in addition to the death of Deputy Seguin.

Last month, Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Adam M. Heinlein was sitting in his cruiser on U.S. 27 when aemitrailer truck ideswiped it, and Sunrise Fire Capt. Steve Grimstead was hit by a passing car at a roadside emergency scene.

In January, Trooper Darryl Haywood Jr. was struck while writing a citation on Florida's Turnpike just south of the Hollywood Boulevard exit.

And most recently, on March 5, a road ranger was killed while closing a lane near an abandoned vehicle on Interstate 275 in Tampa.

Since 1995, 147 law enforcement officers in the United States have been struck or killed by vehicles during traffic stops or while directing traffic, according to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund Organization.

Between July 2002 and December 2005, 13,950 citations were issued to drivers for not abiding by the Move Over law, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

Officials warn drivers to be cautious when changing lanes or decreasing speed.

"It basically comes down to paying attention, if there is a lane open, move over or slow down," Florida Highway Patrol Sgt. Mark Wysocky said. "You can see the lights from far away, so start preparing and start looking to see if a lane is available."

For more information, call Miramar police at 954-602-4400 or Florida Highway Patrol at 850-410-0999 or e-mail fhp@hsmv.state.fl.us.

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Recovery slow for trooper

Haywood unsure of return to job

Published on Monday, February 20, 2006
in the Daytona Beach News-Journal

Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Darryl Haywood Jr. doesn't remember the accident that almost took his life.

Nor does he remember the hours leading up to that fateful moment, but he thinks about how blessed he is to be alive every day.

"I'm just taking it easy, not pushing myself to do too much," he said. "For the most part I'm taking it day by day."

Haywood, 20, was critically injured last month when a pickup struck his cruiser from behind during a traffic stop on the Florida Turnpike in Broward County. He was parked on the west shoulder of the highway near the Miramar toll plaza writing a ticket when the incident occurred.

He points to barely visible scars on his chin and one at the back of his head, happy that he came away from the wreck with no fractures or broken bones.

But Haywood still suffers from muscle pain, dizzy spells and issues with his balance. He moves a little slower than he did before the accident and spends the days resting at his Palm Coast home.

"I still have pain here and there, but I'm better than I was when I was in the hospital so that's always good," Haywood said.

He also visits the Brooks Rehabilitation Center in Palm Coast regularly for physical and occupational therapy to rebuild strength and improve his motor skills like walking and eating.

"It's coming along great," he said. "When I leave there I do feel stronger."

The resilient trooper is still not sure if he will return to the highway patrol as he weighs his love for what he does and the dangers of the job.

"I wouldn't mind returning, but I'm pretty much leaving it up to my doctor," Haywood said.

For Linda Sharpe Haywood, the past month has been a true test of faith. After losing her husband, Trooper Darryl Haywood Sr., less than two years ago when he was killed in a crash on Interstate 4 while chasing a motorcyclist, her son's accident was like painful deja vu.

"I'm still afraid for him because he's my child and I know what the risks are, but I'm also understanding that children will do what they are compelled to do," she said.

As a protective mother, Haywood hopes her son does not return to patrol duties, but she is more concerned that he makes the right decision for his future.

She continues to be heartened by her offspring's positive outlook.

"He remains upbeat and his friends come around all the time and that's encouraging," she said.

In light of her son's accident and several incidents since, Linda Sharpe Haywood hopes to raise public awareness of the Move Over act in the Florida statutes, which requires motorists to yield to emergency vehicles on duty. Drivers must pull to the curb and stop for a passing emergency vehicle, and slow down and vacate the lane closest to parked emergency vehicles.

She hopes to encourage awareness through public service announcements and mandatory driver education materials.

"They should be aware of it to reduce the risk and save lives," she said. "The most important thing is to obey the law."

Haywood Jr. thinks about his father constantly, he says, ever mindful of how lucky he is to have even woken up at all days after the accident.

"I'm just happy to be home and I'm glad to be walking around and still communicating," he said.

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Injured trooper exits hospital

Darryl Haywood Jr. sustained serious injuries when his patrol car was rear-ended Jan. 22.

Published on Saturday, February 4, 2006
in the Orlando Sentinel

MIAMI -- She sat in a hospital room beside the young trooper who hadn't awakened in days, praying there wouldn't be another funeral.

Barely a year had passed since Linda Haywood's husband, Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Darryl Haywood Sr., died in a line-of-duty crash, and now son Darryl Jr. clung to life after being struck while writing a ticket.

"I didn't want to lose them both," she said Friday.

She didn't.

Her son left Jackson Memorial Hospital on his own feet Friday morning, almost two weeks after a horrific crash that left his brain a bit battered, his mother shaken and his future in law enforcement cloudy. He'll return to the Palm Coast area, where his mother lives, for rehabilitation.

"I'm feeling better, as much as I possibly can after that crash," Haywood, 20, told reporters Friday at the hospital's Ryder Trauma Center. "I was unconscious for a couple of days, from what they say, and it was a great feeling just waking up."

Haywood was sitting in his patrol car on the right shoulder of Florida's Turnpike just south of Hollywood on Jan. 22 when a Dodge pickup driven by Robert Fredrick Dimmie Jr., 22, of Fort Lauderdale rammed his cruiser.

Investigators think Dimmie swerved sharply just before the accident, which is still under investigation pending results of blood-alcohol tests.

Friday was filled with relief for Haywood and sad remembrance about his father, a retired New York City officer who served about four years as a trooper. He died on Oct. 2, 2004, after a tire blew while he chased two speeding motorcyclists in Volusia County.

Colleagues remembered the elder Haywood as a father figure, admired for his experience. Father and son also were praised for their treatment of others.

"They are both alike because Darryl Jr. would rather talk to you than write you a ticket, and that's how his father was," said FHP Sgt. Jorge Delahoz, an agency spokesman.

Dr. Phillip Villanueva marveled at Haywood's speedy recovery, although he added the trooper will need rehabilitation and can't even think about returning to work for months.

"These types of injuries are usually associated with very devastating outcomes," Villanueva said. "I think I can call it a miracle."

The future looked much bleaker around 7 a.m. on Jan. 22, when Sgt. Roger Reyes arrived to find the rookie trooper still trapped in the patrol car, bleeding and unconscious.

"It was scary seeing him like that, but the paramedics said he was warm, and that was a good sign," Reyes said.

Haywood and his mother aren't sure what will happen next, although she is hoping his days as a street cop are over. Haywood would like to stay in law enforcement.

"Everything that my mother has been through has always been on my mind, even before this, just by going to work every day," Haywood said.

"She worries, like moms do."

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A TRAGIC CASE OF DEJA VU

Published on Saturday, February 4, 2006
in the Miami Herald

His father was a good man, a hero to some. And, his mother feared, too much of that spirit ended up in their son.

Darryl Haywood Jr. was 19 years old and in what cops call ''rookie school'' when his father, Darryl Sr., was killed.

Darryl Sr., a veteran New York City homicide investigator turned Florida Highway Patrol trooper, blew a tire out during a high-speed chase, spun out and crashed into a tree. He died instantly, and the force of the impact sliced his car in two.

Fast-forward 15 months, to another stretch of Florida highway, and to Darryl Sr.'s son. Early Sunday two weeks ago, Darryl Jr., by now a newly inducted officer with the FHP, had just pulled someone over for a traffic stop in Hollywood when a pickup, hurtling down the turnpike, slammed into his car. It took rescuers half an hour to remove Darryl Jr., unconscious with severe head wounds, from the tangled wreck.

For Darryl Jr.'s mother, Linda, still grieving her husband, it was too horrible a déj vu.

''I just didn't want to lose them both,'' Linda Haywood said Friday. ``But I think my husband was in that car with him, and protected him.''

Darryl Jr. suffered a serious concussion and a bruising injury to his left cerebellum, which helps control the left side. But he recovered, for the most part, faster than anyone expected. He is fully alert, speaks easily and can walk a little. His motor skills on his left side are greatly slowed, but doctors expect, with extensive physical rehabilitation, a full recovery in two months.

DOCTORS STUNNED

Neurologists at Miami's Ryder Trauma Center, where Darryl Jr. was taken, were floored that his injuries weren't worse. On Friday, under his mother's close watch, Darryl Jr. was released from their care, three weeks earlier than projected and far ahead of his doctors' most optimistic hopes.

''I think I can only call it miraculous,'' said Dr. Philip Villanueva, director of neuro-trauma at Jackson Memorial. Injuries like Darryl Jr.'s are usually associated with a ''devastating outcome,'' Villanueva said. ''There had to be some other influence,'' Villanueva said.

The driver of the pickup that crashed into Darryl Jr.'s car, Robert Fredrick Dimmie Jr., 22, of Fort Lauderdale suffered light injuries, and charges are pending the result of a toxicology test. His passenger, Clunie Milhomme, 23, was seriously hurt.

Looking painfully young and bright-eyed and sitting in a wheelchair surrounded by a handful of FHP troopers who knew and loved his dad, Darryl Jr. faced reporters Friday, just before his hospital release.

All he could remember from the day of the crash was slipping into his uniform at dawn. After regaining consciousness, about five days after the crash, his first thoughts were of his mother, and the agony she must have felt. Yet despite the tragedies that being in law enforcement had foisted on his family, and his mother's pleas that he find another job, Darryl Jr. wanted more than anything to get back to work.

''My father would want me to do what's in my heart,'' he said.

Sitting beside her son, Linda Haywood shook her head and interjected ``and to listen to your mother.''

The trouble with her family, Linda Haywood said, was that law enforcement ran thick in their blood. But she intimately knew, she added, that being a police officer was ``a calling.''

Linda's father is a retired police lieutenant, and her sister is a police officer in New York. Linda, now a nurse practitioner, met her husband when the pair was assigned to be patrol partners with the NYPD. The family moved to Florida six years ago. Three months before his death, Darryl Sr. was named ''Trooper of the Month'' for pulling a person from a burning car. The couple's daughter, Erica Malloy, 24, is a nurse but ended up falling for an FHP trooper, Corp. Marcus Brown, after meeting him at Darryl Sr.'s funeral. The couple have been together ever since.

Linda Haywood will care for her son during the coming months in her Palm Coast home and take him to physical rehabilitation sessions there, too. After his hospital release Friday, they picked up clothes from his Plantation apartment and headed north.

LITTLE-KNOWN LAW

The Haywoods and FHP troopers hope the accident will draw attention to Florida's little-known Move Over law. Passed in 2002, it requires drivers to switch lanes or slow down when approaching a police or emergency vehicle stopped on any state highway.

After Darryl Jr.'s release, a nurse helped him carefully into a waiting patrol car. Darryl Jr. took small, stilted steps from the wheelchair to the passenger seat, and the nurse cradled his head as he slipped in. The nurse also had to buckle Darryl Jr.'s seat belt, because his left side is still too weak. But after the car door was shut, he reached into his pants pocket with his right hand and flipped open his cellphone.

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Return home starts trooper's recovery

Published on Saturday, February 4, 2006
in the Daytona Beach News-Journal

Darryl Haywood Jr. and his mother are headed back to Flagler County this morning where the 20-year-old newcomer to the FHP faces a long, arduous recovery.

"He had a brain injury, as well as his concussion," Linda Sharpe Haywood said of her son Friday. "He's going to undergo extensive therapy."

Haywood was released from the Ryder Trauma Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital where he spent several days after his Jan. 22 accident on Florida's Turnpike, near Hollywood. Seconds after a traffic stop, his patrol car was rammed by a truck that veered off the interstate. The cruiser slammed into a guardrail then crashed into the car of the motorist Haywood had pulled over. He was airlifted to Jackson Memorial in critical condition.

Florida Highway Patrol Sgt. Jorge Delahoz, a spokesman for the turnpike system, said Haywood is doing well, but he noticed the trooper was having some difficulty speaking at a press conference Friday morning just after he was released from Ryder.

"His motor skills were delayed," Delahoz said. "But he's going to be all right and I would love to see him come back."

Whether Haywood will be back in the khaki uniform of the FHP anytime soon is still questionable.

His mother would like him to go back to school, but said she realizes her son's future will be up to him.

"He was always very good in science," Linda Sharpe Haywood said Friday. "He had majored in pharmacology at (Florida A&M University).

"My wishes are that he return to school, but you know how that is. It will be up to him," she said.

It may be a difficult choice, Delahoz said, only because being a police officer is in "Haywood's blood."

Mother Linda Sharpe Haywood was an officer with the New York City police and so was Haywood's father, Darryl Haywood Sr.

"That's how Darryl's parents met," DeLahoz said. "He has other relatives that are police officers also."

The elder Haywood was killed in October 2004 on Interstate 4 as he pursued a motorcyclist who was racing along the highway at more than 100 mph, FHP officials said. Donald Williams, 39, was sentenced to 30 years in prison.

In Haywood Jr.'s case, charges have not been filed against truck driver Robert Frederick Dimmie pending a toxicology test, Delahoz said.

On the trip home to Palm Coast today, Linda Sharpe Haywood said she and her son will have some company -- Darryl Jr.'s pit bull puppy.

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Injured highway patrol trooper to be released from hospital

Published on Friday, February 3, 2006
in the Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel

HOLLYWOOD -- A Florida Highway Patrol trooper injured nearly two weeks ago when he was hit by a car during a traffic stop was expected to be released from the hospital on Friday, news partner NBC 6 reported.

Darryl Haywood Jr., 'whose father was a state trooper who was killed in the line of duty, had his own close call when he suffered a severe concussion as a result of the Jan. 22 crash on Florida's Turnpike in Hollywood.

Doctors at the Ryder Trauma Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital say it could be months before Haywood is back on active duty, but his prognosis for recovery is good.

Haywood was injured when a motorist rear-ended his parked patrol car and crumpled it like an accordion, authorities said. He was trapped in his crushed 2003 Ford Crown Victoria for nearly half an hour before being released and airlifted to Ryder Trauma Center.

The 20-year-old trooper was found bleeding profusely from the head. Three others were also injured in the 7 a.m. three-car accident, which happened just south of the Hollywood Boulevard exit while Haywood was sitting in his patrol car writing a traffic ticket.

Haywood had pulled over a 1996 Hyundai driven by Ratasha Washington, 27, of Miami. The patrol car and the Hyundai were stopped and parked on the west shoulder of the roadway when a 1994 Dodge pickup driven by Robert Frederick Dimmle, 22, of Fort Lauderdale, veered from the center lane "for unknown reasons," according to a Florida Highway Patrol news release. The pickup rear-ended the patrol car, causing it to rear-end the Hyundai. Finally, the pickup overturned and came to a rest in the center lane, the release says.

Southbound lanes of the turnpike were closed for about three hours.

A passenger in the pickup, Clunie Milhomme, 23, of Fort Lauderdale, also was airlifted to the trauma center. The other two drivers, who were not seriously injured, were taken to Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood.

Haywood's father, Darryl Haywood Sr., was the 39th Florida trooper to die in the line of duty. He was 49 when he died in an October 2004 crash while chasing a speeding motorcyclist on Interstate 4 in Volusia County.

The elder Haywood was pursuing Hillsborough County motorcyclist Donald Williams, with their speeds topping 100 mph, when a tire blew out on Haywood's Chevrolet Camaro, causing him to spin out, strike another car and crash into a pine tree.

Williams was sentenced to 30 years in prison on charges of aggravated manslaughter and aggravated fleeing and eluding a law-enforcement officer causing death.

Haywood Sr. had joined the agency in 2000 after a 20-year career with the New York Police Department.

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Youngest State Trooper Injured During Traffic Stop Released From Hospital

Published on Friday, February 3, 2006
in the Local 10 News

MIAMI -- A rookie Florida Highway Patrol trooper seriously injured while on a traffic stop in Miramar last month was released from Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center Friday.

Trooper Darryl Haywood Jr. pulled over a motorist on Florida's Turnpike and was in his patrol cruiser when a pickup truck that veered onto the shoulder rammed it from behind Jan. 22.

The impact pushed the patrol car into a Hyundai that Haywood, 20, had just pulled over.

"I have no recollection -- no recollection of what happened to me," Haywood said at a news conference Friday.

The driver of the pickup, Robert Dimmie Jr., 22, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., was treated for minor injuries.

Haywood, who left the hospital in a wheelchair, suffered a severe concussion and has been undergoing neurological rehabilitation.

"Darryl probably won't be ready for active duty for one or two more months, but his prognosis is very good," Dr. Phillip Villanueva said.

Haywood's father was killed in October 2004 when his cruiser crashed into a tree on Interstate 4 in Volusia County. He was trying to stop a speeding motorcyclist when a tire on his cruiser blew out.

"I'm just absolutely blessed," Haywood's mother, Linda Haywood, said. "The experience that I went through 15 months ago shook me and, undoubtedly, this didn't help, but I just wanted a good outcome from this. I didn't want to lose them both."

Haywood Jr. is the youngest person to become a state trooper.

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Trooper to leave hospital

Published on Friday, February 3, 2006
in the Orlando Sentinel

A Florida Highway Patrol trooper who was struck by a pickup last week will be released from a South Florida hospital today, officials said.

Darryl Haywood Jr., the son of a trooper killed in Volusia County less than two years ago, was hospitalized with serious injuries after he was hit by a pickup while writing a ticket in his patrol car in Miramar, the Highway Patrol said. Haywood will continue rehabilitation in Palm Coast as an outpatient.

During an 11 a.m. news conference today, Haywood plans to thank the emergency medical and hospital personnel who helped him, the FHP said.

The conference will be in the Ryder Trauma Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, where Haywood has been recovering.

Haywood's father died in the line of duty when his cruiser blew a tire and crashed as he was chasing a motorcyclist at high speeds.

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Trooper's crash calls attention to road safety

Published on Wednesday, February 1, 2006
in the Tampa Bay 10 News

Video Story

Tampa, Florida - Law enforcement officers put their lives on the line every day. It's part of the job, and it's a risk they accept. Yet, when one of their own is killed or injured in the line of duty, the pain is felt by everyone who wears a uniform. That's why the Florida Highway Patrol is speaking out about a serious crash that nearly killed a trooper.

Hundreds of vehicles whiz past a state trooper on I-275 in Tampa. Few bother to slow down, let alone move into the next lane. One wrong move and it's a recipe for disaster.

Trooper Larry Coggins, Florida Highway Patrol:
"There's a million things troopers have to look out for on a traffic stop. We're also looking over our shoulder for that 3-4,000 pound bullet, if I may, that's coming down the highway."

Despite all the precautions Trooper Darryl Haywood Junior was taking during a January 22nd traffic stop on Florida's turnpike in Broward County, it wasn't enough to keep the 20-year-old out of harm's way. A speeding pick-up truck rear-ended his patrol car.

Trooper Larry Coggins, Florida Highway Patrol:
“The crash, very serious in nature, trapped Trooper Haywood in his patrol car for 30 to 40 minutes while rescue crews broke the car apart to get him out."

The driver of that pick-up truck violated the state's “Move Over” law, which requires motorists to do just that -- move over, or at the very least, slow down -- when any emergency vehicle is stopped on the road. Since the move over law was established in 2002, more than 13,000 citations have been issued to motorists across the state, and no law enforcement officers have been lost as a result.

But that could've easily changed, if Trooper Haywood hadn't been so lucky. His condition is improving every day. He’s now listed in stable condition at a Miami hospital. And his story is striking a chord with every emergency responder, a reminder of the risk they all face every day.

The penalty for failing to move over or slow down for emergency responders is the same as a moving violation that carries a fine from $115 to $120, depending on the county. It also adds three points to your license.

This is the second time tragedy has struck the Haywood family in 18 months. Trooper Haywood's father, Darryl Haywood Senior, was also a Florida State Trooper. He was killed in the line of duty in October 2004. He was attempting to overtake a speeding motorcycle in Volusia County when his tire blew out and his patrol car struck a tree.

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Mom says trooper has improved

Published on Saturday, January 28, 2006
in the Daytona Beach News-Journal

The condition of a Florida Highway Patrol trooper from Palm Coast critically injured on the job, and whose father, also a trooper, was killed on duty last year, has improved, his mother said in a short letter.

"His condition has been upgraded to fair," Trooper Darryl Haywood Jr.'s mother, Linda Sharpe Haywood, said in the note dated Jan. 26 and made available Friday by FHP officials. "Trooper Haywood is grateful for all of the prayers, words of encouragement and support he has received."

The 20-year-old Haywood parked his patrol car on the west shoulder of Florida's Turnpike in Miramar almost a week ago during a traffic stop.

FHP turnpike spokesman Sgt. Jorge Delahoz said a truck driven by Robert Frederick Dimmie veered from the southbound center lane of the interstate and careened into Haywood's vehicle.

The cruiser was pushed into a guardrail, then slammed into the car Haywood had stopped, Delahoz said.

Haywood was airlifted in critical condition to Ryder Trauma Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami.

In her letter, Linda Sharpe Haywood said her son has now been moved to Ryder's Neurological Rehabilitation Unit.

Darryl Haywood Sr. was killed in a crash on Interstate 4 in October 2004. The seasoned trooper was pursuing motorcyclist Donald Williams, who was racing east on the interstate at more than 100 mph, FHP officials said. One of the tires on the elder Haywood's cruiser blew out, sending him first into another motorist, then into a tree.

Williams was sentenced to 30 years in prison, for aggravated manslaughter, vehicular homicide and fleeing or attempting to elude an officer causing death.

In Haywood Jr.'s case, troopers believe Dimmie may have been drinking and charges are pending toxicology tests.

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Trooper's condition improves

Published on Thursday, January 26, 2006
in the Daytona Beach News-Journal

A rookie state trooper from Palm Coast has been moved to a regular hospital room in Miami after a highway collision when a pickup crashed into his parked patrol cruiser.

Trooper Darryl Haywood Jr.'s condition is still improving, Florida Highway Patrol officials said.

On Tuesday Haywood Jr. was moved from Ryder Trauma Center to a regular room at Jackson Memorial Hospital, troopers said.

He was eating, talking and generally improving, FHP Lt. Tim Frith said.

Haywood Jr., injured Sunday in Broward County, is the son of Trooper Darryl Haywood, who was killed in 2004 while chasing a motorcyclist on Interstate 4 in Volusia County.

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Injured trooper improving

Published on Tuesday, January 24, 2006
in the Orlando Sentinel

A Florida Highway Patrol trooper is recovering from serious injuries in a crash Sunday morning on Florida's Turnpike, officials said Monday.

Darryl Haywood Jr., son of a trooper killed less than two years ago in Volusia County, was struck by a pickup while writing a ticket in his patrol car in Miramar. He was flown to a Miami hospital with life-threatening injuries.

Officials said his condition improved and, by Sunday night, Haywood was able to speak, FHP Sgt. Jorge Delahoz said.

"He seems to be coming along pretty well," Delahoz said. "In general, his prognosis is very positive."

Haywood is undergoing further medical tests, he said.

Haywood, 20, joined FHP in June 2005 and is assigned to Troop K in Broward County. His father, Darryl Haywood Sr., died during a high-speed pursuit in October 2004 on Interstate 4.

Sunday's crash remains under investigation.

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Son of fallen trooper recovers

Published on Tuesday, January 24, 2006
in the Daytona Beach News-Journal

"He's still under close supervision of the doctors (at the Ryder Trauma Center in Miami)," said Sgt. Jorge DeLahoz, a spokesman for the Florida Highway Patrol.

"The doctors are very optimistic," DeLahoz added. "He was awake and talking to his mother last night."

Haywood, 20, was making a traffic stop Sunday morning on the Florida Turnpike when his patrol car was struck from behind by the pickup. The trooper had parked on the shoulder of the highway to write a ticket on a car with a burned-out light.

Troopers are waiting for toxicology reports before filing charges against the pickup driver, Robert Frederick Dimmie, 22, of Fort Lauderdale.

Haywood is the son of Trooper Darryl Haywood Sr., who was killed in a crash on Interstate 4 on Oct. 2, 2004, while chasing motorcyclist Donald Williams.

Williams was sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being convicted of aggravated manslaughter, vehicular homicide and fleeing or attempting to elude an officer causing death.

The younger Haywood was studying to be a law enforcement officer at the time of his father's death, recalled Louie Mercer, the director of the Emergency Services Institute at Daytona Beach Community College.

"He showed a lot of courage, dedication and guts," Mercer said.

Chris Walters, a friend of the family, said Haywood Jr. went to school the day after his dad's death.

"He knew it was something his father would have wanted him to do," said Walters, a freelance photographer for The News-Journal. "His character is unbelievable."

Haywood graduated last year from DBCC and was assigned to work as a trooper in South Florida.

DBCC uses "unfortunate incidents" like those involving the Haywoods to prepare students for the reality of a career in law enforcement, Mercer said. It's a way of letting them know that police work is not quite like the "glitz and glamour" of TV cop shows.

"We try to inoculate them a little bit," Mercer said.

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Injured FHP trooper improving after crash

A Florida Highway Patrol officer whose father was killed in Central Florida during a high-speed pursuit was critically injured Sunday after being hit by a car in South Florida, according to WKMG-TV.

Published on Tuesday, January 24, 2006
in the Miami Herald

Trooper Darryl Haywood Jr. was in his patrol car writing a ticket in Miami Sunday when a driver of a white Dodge pickup veered from the center lane and slammed into the officer's cruiser.

Haywood was transported to Jackson Memorial Hospital with life-threatening injuries. Doctors said Haywood will likely survive the crash, WKMG-TV reported Sunday night.

The crash comes less than two years after his father, Darryl Haywood Sr., was killed on Interstate 4 in Volusia County. Haywood Sr. was killed in a crash while attempting to stop a high-speed drag race in Oct. 2004.

Haywood Jr. told WKMG-TV in an earlier interview that he was born to be an officer.

"It seems like a calling almost," Haywood Jr. said. "When I get behind the wheel I'm not nervous. It seems like it was made for me to do."

Charges against the driver of the pickup are pending the outcome of blood test results.

The wreck closed the road for hours as rescue crews helped Haywood Jr.

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Trooper With Family History Of Tragedy Critically Injured

Published on Monday, January 23, 2006
in the WJXT News

A Florida Highway Patrol officer whose father was killed in Central Florida during a high-speed pursuit was critically injured Sunday after being hit by a car in South Florida, according to WKMG-TV.

Trooper Darryl Haywood Jr. was in his patrol car writing a ticket in Miami Sunday when a driver of a white Dodge pickup veered from the center lane and slammed into the officer's cruiser.

Haywood was transported to Jackson Memorial Hospital with life-threatening injuries. Doctors said Haywood will likely survive the crash, WKMG-TV reported Sunday night.

The crash comes less than two years after his father, Darryl Haywood Sr., was killed on Interstate 4 in Volusia County. Haywood Sr. was killed in a crash while attempting to stop a high-speed drag race in Oct. 2004.

Haywood Jr. told WKMG-TV in an earlier interview that he was born to be an officer.

"It seems like a calling almost," Haywood Jr. said. "When I get behind the wheel I'm not nervous. It seems like it was made for me to do."

Charges against the driver of the pickup are pending the outcome of blood test results.

The wreck closed the road for hours as rescue crews helped Haywood Jr.

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Palm Coast trooper's son hurt in crash

Published on Monday, January 23, 2006
in the Daytona Beach News-Journal

Haywood Jr., 20, was parked on the west shoulder of the Florida Turnpike near the Miramar toll plaza about 7 a.m. when a truck veered off the road and struck Haywood's patrol car, said Sgt. Jorge DeLahoz, FHP spokesman.

He was airlifted in critical condition to the Ryder Trauma Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. At 2 p.m., he was listed in serious but stable condition, DeLahoz said.

Haywood Jr. joined the FHP shortly after his father, Trooper Darryl Haywood Sr. was killed in a crash on Interstate 4 Oct 2. 2004. The elder Haywood was chasing motorcyclist Donald Williams, topping speeds of more than 100 mph when a tire on Haywood's Camaro cruiser blew out and he crashed into a car and then a tree.

On Dec. 2, Williams was sentenced to 30 years in prison on charges of aggravated manslaughter, vehicular homicide, and fleeing or attempting to elude an officer causing death.

Haywood Jr. graduated from the FHP academy in June 2005 and was assigned to Troop K in Broward County.

He had stopped Ratosha Washington, 27, of Miami on the west shoulder of the turnpike southbound in Miramar when a pickup driven by Robert Frederick Dimmie veered from the center southbound lane and struck Haywood's patrol car. Haywood's car was pushed into the guardrail and then struck Washington's car, DeLahoz said.

Dimmie was taken to Hollywood Memorial Hospital. His passenger, Clunie Milhomme, 23, was also taken to the Ryder Trauma Center.

Troopers believe Dimmie may have been drinking and are awaiting toxicology tests to determine if alcohol was a factor in the crash, DeLahoz said. Charges are pending a complete investigation.

In a statement to the press, Linda Sharpe-Haywood of Palm Coast thanked FHP personnel and emergency workers who helped her son.

"It has only been a short time since Darryl's father, Darryl Haywood Sr., was tragically killed while on duty serving the citizens of Florida," she said. "We thank everyone for their concerns and prayers."

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FHP trooper survives after pickup truck crushes cruiser on turnpike

Published on Monday, January 23, 2006
in the Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel

A Florida Highway Patrol trooper whose father was killed in the line of duty had his own close call Sunday, when a motorist on the Florida Turnpike rear-ended his parked patrol car and crumpled it like an accordion, authorities said.

Darryl Haywood Jr. was trapped in his crushed 2003 Ford Crown Victoria for nearly half an hour before being released and airlifted to Ryder Trauma Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital, FHP Lt. Roger Reyes said.

The 20-year-old trooper, who was found bleeding profusely from the head, was going to be hospitalized for several days, and he was in serious but stable condition, Reyes said Sunday afternoon.

Three others were also injured in the 7 a.m. three-car accident, which happened just south of the Hollywood Boulevard exit while Haywood was sitting in his patrol car writing a traffic ticket.

Haywood had pulled over a 1996 Hyundai driven by Ratasha Washington, 27, of Miami. The patrol car and the Hyundai were stopped and parked on the west shoulder of the roadway when a 1994 Dodge pickup driven by Robert Frederick Dimmle, 22, of Fort Lauderdale, veered from the center lane "for unknown reasons," according to a Florida Highway Patrol news release. The pickup rear-ended the patrol car, causing it to rear-end the Hyundai. Finally, the pickup overturned and came to a rest in the center lane, the release says.

Southbound lanes of the turnpike were closed for about three hours.

A passenger in the pickup, Clunie Milhomme, 23, of Fort Lauderdale, also was airlifted to the trauma center, where she was in stable condition Sunday afternoon, Reyes said. The other two drivers, who were not seriously injured, were taken to Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood.

"We're out here trying to make the roads safe, doing what we have to do, understanding the dangers of the job," Reyes said. "We just need the general public to not be distracted and pay attention and understand we have families too, and we want to be able to go home at the end of the day and not worry about being struck on the side of the road."

Haywood's father, Darryl Haywood Sr., was the 39th Florida trooper to die in the line of duty. He was 49 when he died in an October 2004 crash while chasing a speeding motorcyclist on Interstate 4 in Volusia County.

The elder Haywood was pursuing Hillsborough County motorcyclist Donald Williams, with their speeds topping 100 mph, when a tire blew out on Haywood's Chevrolet Camaro, causing him to spin out, strike another car and crash into a pine tree.

Williams was sentenced to 30 years in prison on charges of aggravated manslaughter and aggravated fleeing and eluding a law-enforcement officer causing death.

Haywood Sr. had joined the agency in 2000 after a 20-year career with the New York Police Department.

"It has only been a short time since Darryl's father Trooper Darryl L. Haywood Sr. was tragically killed while on duty serving the citizens of Florida," his widow and the injured trooper's mother, Linda Sharpe-Haywood, said in a written statement. "We would ask for the public to pray for Darryl and the others involved in the crash."

On Sunday afternoon she was en route from her home in the Daytona Beach area to visit her son at Jackson.

The younger Haywood graduated from FHP Academy in June 2005 and was assigned to the agency's Troop K in Broward County.

Reyes, Haywood Jr.'s supervisor, described the young trooper as eager to learn and always asking questions of supervisors and senior troopers.

Reyes said a thorough investigation of Sunday's crash would ensue.

"We'll be looking at all factors to see what caused the crash," he said. "We'll be looking to see if impairment or fatigue contributed."

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Tragedy strikes again

Published on Monday, January 23, 2006
in the Miami Herald

A rookie Florida Highway Patrol trooper struck by a truck and seriously injured while conducting a traffic stop in Broward County on Sunday morning is the son of a trooper who was killed about 15 months ago while chasing a speeder.

About 7 a.m. Sunday, trooper Darryl Haywood Jr. had stopped a motorist heading south on Florida's Turnpike, just south of the Hollywood Boulevard exit, for a burned-out light.

Haywood was still in his patrol cruiser when it was rammed from behind by a 1994 Dodge pickup truck driven by Robert Frederick Dimmie Jr., 22, of Fort Lauderdale. Dimmie's truck had veered from the center lane onto the shoulder, highway patrol officials said.

The impact pushed the patrol car into the Hyundai he had pulled over, driven by Ratosha Washington, 27, of Miami, who escaped with minor injuries, troopers said.

It took rescue crews about 30 minutes to pull Haywood, 20, from his destroyed patrol car.

''The trunk was pretty much pushed into the back seat,'' FHP Lt. Roger Reyes said.

Haywood was flown to Ryder Trauma Center in Miami, where, Reyes said, doctors have indicated he is expected to recover from injuries.

Haywood's name is very familiar to troopers -- his father, Darryl Haywood Sr., was killed Oct. 2, 2004, when his cruiser crashed into a tree on Interstate 4 in Volusia County while he was trying to stop a speeding motorcyclist. The tire of the elder Haywood's cruiser blew out during the crash, which exceeded speeds of 100 mph.

The elder Haywood, a 20-year veteran of the New York Police Department, had worked for the highway patrol for four years.

Despite the danger of his father's profession, the younger Haywood entered the highway patrol's academy and was sworn in this past summer.

His mother, the elder Haywood's widow, said in a statement issued Sunday that ``it has only been a short time since Darryl's father, Trooper Darryl L. Haywood Sr., was tragically killed while on duty serving the citizens of Florida.''

Linda Sharpe-Haywood said in her statement that ``we would ask for the public to pray for Darryl and the others involved in the crash.''

After hitting the back of the younger Haywood's patrol car, Dimmie's truck flipped over. Dimmie was taken Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood with a minor injury, troopers said. A passenger in the pickup, Clunie Milhomme, 23, of Fort Lauderdale, was taken to Ryder Trauma Center with serious injuries.

All southbound lanes of the turnpike were shut down for about three hours.

Reyes said the crash is a reminder of why legislators passed the ''Move Over'' law, which went into effect more than three years ago. The law requires drivers on a highway to move a lane over when it is safe to do so if a police officer or emergency worker is on the side of the road. If they are not able to move over, drivers are supposed to slow down.

Dimmie could face charges from Sunday's accident pending the results of toxicology tests, highway patrol officials said.

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Trooper injured in 3-car crash

Darryl Haywood Jr. is the son of a trooper killed in 2004 during a high-speed chase.

Published on Monday, January 23, 2006
in the Orlando Sentinel

A Florida Highway Patrol trooper was hospitalized in serious condition in South Florida after his vehicle was struck by a pickup today -- less than two years after his father, also an FHP trooper, was killed during a high-speed pursuit in Volusia County, officials said.

Darryl Haywood Jr., 20, was listed in serious but stable condition this afternoon at Ryder Trauma Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, said FHP Sgt. Jorge Delahoz.

Haywood's condition improved hours after he was airlifted with critical, life-threatening injuries from today's crash, which happened while he was writing a traffic ticket in his FHP vehicle just before 7 a.m. today on Florida's Turnpike near mile marker 48 in Miramar, Delahoz said.

The injured trooper's father, Trooper Darryl Haywood, 49, was killed while chasing a speeding motorcyclist on Interstate 4 in Volusia County on Oct. 2, 2004.

The elder Haywood was pursuing motorcyclist Donald Williams, with their speeds topping 100 mph, when the elder Haywood's Chevrolet Camaro sustained a tire blowout, spun, struck another car and then crashed into a pine tree, authorities said.

On Dec. 2, Williams was sentenced to 30|years in prison on charges of aggravated manslaughter and aggravated fleeing and eluding a law-enforcement officer causing death.

The elder Haywood joined the agency in 2000 after a 20-year career with the New York Police Department.

His son graduated from FHP Training Academy in June and was assigned to the agency's Troop K in Broward County, Delahoz said.

FHP officials, including the elder Haywood's former supervisor, gave widow Linda Haywood a ride from her home in Palm Coast to Miami today, Delahoz said.

"For her own safety, they picked her up, and they brought her down," Delahoz said.

After arriving in Miami, she read a statement for television news reporters, he said.

"At this time, our thoughts and prayers are with Darryl. We would ask for the public to pray for Darryl and others involved in the crash," she said in the statement, which Delahoz read to the Orlando Sentinel.

She thanked the FHP, first responders, physicians and others and noted that it has only been a short time since the elder Haywood was "tragically killed while on duty serving the citizens of Florida," Delahoz said.

Darryl Haywood Jr. was stopped and sitting in his FHP vehicle on the west shoulder of the turnpike behind a 1996 Hyundai he had pulled over, Delahoz said.

The car was driven by Ratosha Washington, 27, of Miami, according to an FHP news release, who was pulled over for a faulty-equipment violation.

For "unknown reasons," the release said, a 1994 Dodge pickup driven by Robert Fredrick Dimmie Jr., 22, of Fort Lauderdale heading south in the center lane of the turnpike "just veered into the path" of Haywood's vehicle.

Struck by Dimmie's vehicle, Haywood's vehicle then struck Washington's Hyundai, the release said.

A passenger in the pickup identified as Clunie Milhomme, 23, of Fort Lauderdale also was transported to Ryder Trauma Center, Delahoz said.

Dimmie and Washington were transported to Hollywood Memorial Hospital, Delahoz said.

He didn't know the conditions of Milhomme, Dimmie and Washington.

The crash closed southbound lanes of the turnpike for about three hours.

Delahoz said investigators suspect Dimmie was "impaired" and they are awaiting the results of a toxicology report.

No charges have yet been filed.

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Trooper Seriously Injured in Crash

 

 
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