Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Home | Espaņol | Driver License | Vehicle Tags & Titles | Florida Highway Patrol | Contact Us | Forms | Office Locations
FHP Logo

Frequently Asked Questions & Answers

FHP Door Seal

FHP Home

How do I request a speaker on safety issues for my school or organization?

Contact the nearest Public Affairs Officer for your area. Try to give as much lead time as possible by contacting the PAO a couple of months before you actually need them.

How to report persons suspected of auto theft:

Florida Highway Patrol
Auto Theft Tip Line

If you have information about a stolen vehicle, suspected car thieves, or chop shop activities,

CALL 1-800-HELP-CAT
(1-800-435-7228)

How to get a copy of a crash report?

Crash reports may be obtained from the local Florida Highway Patrol Station that is closest to where the crash occurred. Crash reports are kept in the local districts for 2 years from the date of crash. Homicide reports are kept in the local districts for 5 years from the date of crash.

To order a crash report older than 2 years, call (850) 617-3416.

To order a traffic homicide report older than 5 years, call (850) 617-2306.

To order traffic homicide photographs, call (850) 617-3409.

NOTE: When requesting photographs, have at least two of the following pieces of information available when you place your request:

Date of Crash
County of Crash
Name of Fatality Victim
Traffic Homicide Case Number

How to Report Odometer Fraud?

To report suspected cases of Odometer Fraud, call(850)488-6582

What is the starting salary?

$30,825.36 annually or $35,825.16 in Palm Beach, Broward, Dade, Monroe, or $37,007.64 in Collier and Lee Counties.

Will I have to complete the full academy if I have experience with another police agency from another state?

Yes!

Where will I be assigned after graduation from the academy?

Manpower needs of the agency, vacant positions, and transfer requests determine the new recruits first duty assignment.

How long does it take to be hired once I apply?

That depends on the starting date of the next training academy, but usually 6 to 9 months.

Tell me about the selection process.

All applicants must pass a written, polygraph, psychological and physical examination, along with a background investigation and Physical Aptitude Test(PAT)

Is FHP currently accepting applications?

Yes!

Is there a closing date for applications?
No!

What type of retirement system does FHP have?

Effective July 1, 2001, each member is vested at 6 years, however, full benefits are awarded after 25 years of service and is based on 3% per year. Please visit www.frs.state.fl.us/ for additional retirement information.

What are the minimum requirements for becoming a Florida State Trooper?

You must be a US citizen of at least 19 years old and possess a valid drivers license. However, preference is given to applicants who possess at least the equivalent of an associates degree from an accredited college, or 2 years of military service with an honorable discharge, or at least 1 year of sworn law enforcement experience with a current Florida certification.

What are some of your benefits?

Paid vacation, sick, and military leave, plus all uniforms, weapons and a take home patrol car are furnished.

Are there any methods to supplement the starting salary?

Yes, Hireback Programs and Criminal Justice Incentive Pay.

Does FHP accept applications from non-Florida residents?

Yes

Do you have to have a Florida drivers license before you can apply?

No, but your D/L must be valid and all fines in all states that you have been licensed to drive must be paid.

Do I receive a salary while I am attending the academy?

Yes, $2,201.92 per month. Room and board are included.

How long is the FHP training academy in Tallahassee?

26 weeks. You will receive an additional 10 weeks of training with a Field Training Officer at your first duty assignment.

Where do I get a 3x3 photograph and does it have to be exactly 3x3?

Any full face photograph may be cut to size.

Is there any other source of information on the Florida Highway Patrol?

Yes, please visit our web site at www.flhsmv.gov/fhp/

How important is my credit status?

Very important, before applying, please make arrangements with all creditors with who you have overdue accounts to pay the balance in full. If any accounts are with a collection agency, please rectify the situation prior to submitting your application. Also, please provide any documentation reference the arrangements for repayment with the application.

What can I do to improve my credit?

Contact your local Consumer Credit Council for assistance or contact each creditor and enter into a repayment schedule plan and have the company send you a letter confirming the arrangements.

What if I am still in the military and do not have my DD214?

Have your Company Commander write you a letter on official letterhead, detailing your separation date and type of discharge expected.

What are the chances for a recuit returning to his or her home county after completing the academy?

It does occur, however, prepare yourself and family that your first duty assignment may not be your home county. Transfers are accepted after 12 months of service in that current assignment.

What if I have been arrested before?

All depends on what the arrest was for. Felony, DUI and Domestic Violence arrests can be automatic disqualifiers. If you were arrested for a misdemeanor charge or as a juvenile, you should attach all police reports and court disposition documents to the application for evaluation.

How can I prepare for the written exam?

More information and a practice test are available at www.ifpra.com/

What is the maximum age limit for FHP?

There is no age ceiling concerning the hiring process.

Do my technical school credits qualify as accredited college course hours?

No

Do I have to get driving records from every state where I have ever been licensed?

Yes, the records must be the original certified record form the state DMV, local police printouts and copies are not acceptable.

If I pass all of the examinations, then what happens?

Your file is turned over to the Chief Background Investigator, who will assign it to a Regional Background Investigator who will complete the investigation. If you pass the background investigation, you will be placed on the "ready to hire" list, awaiting the start of the next academy.

If I make the ready to hire list, does that mean I will get invited to the next academy?

Not necessarily. FHP's Director and the Executive Staff will select the recruits for the next academy based on FHP's preferences of education, military and prior sworn law enforcement experience.

How often may an applicant enter the selection process?

Phase 1(written and PAT examinations) is administered at least 4 times per year. Phase 1 is usually given in the last half of January, April, July, and October.

Can I get an application online?

Yes, a state of Florida application may be downloaded and mailed to the Background Investigation Section, 2900 Apalachee Parkway MS49, Neil Kirkman Building, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0525.

If I have an Associate or Bachelors degree, how does it help me?

The associate degree is worth an extra 30 dollars per month and the bachelor degree is worth an extra 80 dollars per month in incentive monies for your entire career.

What happens if I miss or fail to attend the written test and PAT?

The applicant should submit another State of Florida Application, and start the process over for the next testing cycle.

What happens if I fail the written test?

The applicant will not be considered for employment for a 1-year period from the date of the written test, at that time the applicant may reapply.

Motor Scooters- Are they legal in Florida?

It is unlawful to operate a motor scooter as defined in Florida statute 316.003(82), on any roadway in Florida, unless the operator has a valid diver license. By a ruling of the Attorney General (AGO 2002-47) these vehicles are not subject to the equipment and safe driving requirements of a motor vehicle contained in chapter 316. However, if such vehicles are operated on the roads of Florida, the operator must possess a valid driver license per chapter 322.03.

All of Florida's statutes may be viewed at
www.leg.state.fl.us.

Attorney Generals Office Legal Opinion 2002-47

Are motorized scooters subject to the equipment and safe driving requirements of a motor vehicle or the provisions relating to mopeds or "electric personal assistive mobility devices" prescribed in Chapter 316, Florida Statutes?

In sum:

As of July 1, 2002, motorized scooters are excluded from the definition of "motor vehicle" for purposes of Chapter 316, Florida Statutes, and therefore are not subject to the equipment and safe driving requirements of a motor vehicle contained in that chapter, nor are the provisions relating to mopeds or "electric personal assistive mobility devices" prescribed in C hapter 316, Florida Statutes, applicable to motorized scooters.

In Attorney General Opinion 93-45, this office concluded that a motorized scooter powered by a gasoline engine with a maximum speed of 20 miles per hour may be characterized as a "motor vehicle" pursuant to section 316.003(21), Florida Statutes 1993, and that the drivers and operators of these scooters were subject to the provisions of Chapter 316, Florida Statutes, governing vehicles and vehicular traffic. At that time, section 316.003(21) defined "motor vehicle" as "[a]ny self-propelled vehicle not operated upon rails or guideway, but not including any bicycle or moped."[1]

You have advised this office that the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles has stated that motorized scooters, are subject to the regulations regarding equipment and safe driving requirements of a motor vehicle as mandated by Chapter 316, Florida Statutes. [2] In addition, the department, relying on the opinion of the Second District Court of Appeal in State v. Riley,[3] has concluded that a motorized scooter driver is required to have a driver's license.[4]

During the 2002 legislative session, however, the Legislature amended the definition of "motor vehicle," effective July 1, 2002. Section 67 of Chapter 02-20, Laws of Florida, amends section 316.003(21) to define "motor vehicle" as "[a]ny self-propelled vehicle not operated upon rails or guideway, but not including any bicycle, motorized scooter, electric personal assistive mobility device, or moped."

Section 67 of Chapter 02-20, supra, also adds subsections (82) and (83) to section 316.003, Florida Statutes, which respectively define "motorized scooter" and "electric personal assistive mobility device":

"(82) MOTORIZED SCOOTER. - Any vehicle not having a seat or saddle for the use of the rider, designed to travel on not more than three wheels, and not capable of propelling the vehicle at a speed greater than 30 miles per hour on level ground.

(83) ELECTRIC PERSONAL ASSISTIVE MOBILITY DEVICE. - Any self-balancing, two-nontandum-wheeled device, designed to transport only one person, with an electric propulsion system with average power of 750 watts (1 horsepower), the maximum speed of which, on a paved level surface when powered solely by such a propulsion system while being ridden by an operator who weighs 170 pounds, is less than 20 miles per hour. Electric personal assistive mobility devices are not vehicles as defined in this section."

Section 68 of Chapter 02-20, Laws of Florida, creates section 316.2068, Florida Statutes, which provides:

"316.2068 Electric personal assistive mobility devices; regulations.--
(1) An electric personal assistive mobility device, as defined in s. 316.003, may be operated:

(a) On a road or street where the posted speed limit is 25 miles per hour or less.
(b) On a marked bicycle path.
(c) On any street or road where bicycles are permitted.
(d) At an intersection, to cross a road or street even if the road or street has a posted speed limit of
more than 25 miles per hour.
(e) On a sidewalk, if the person operating the device yields the right-of-way to pedestrians and gives an audible signal before overtaking and passing a pedestrian.
(2) A valid driver's license is not a prerequisite to operating an electric personal assistive mobility device.
(3) Electric personal assistive mobility devices need not be registered and insured in accordance with
s. 320.02.
(4) A person who is under the age of 16 years may not operate, ride, or otherwise be propelled on an electric personal assistive mobility device unless the person wears a bicycle helmet that is properly fitted, that is fastened securely upon his or her head by a strap, and that meets the standards of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI Z Bicycle Helmet Standards), the standards of the Snell Memorial Foundation (1984 Standard for Protective Headgear for Use in Bicycling), or any other nationally recognized standards for bicycle helmets which are adopted by the department.
(5) A county or municipality may prohibit the operation of electric personal assistive mobility devices on any road, street, or bicycle path under its jurisdiction if the governing body of the county or municipality determines that such a prohibition is necessary in the interest of safety.
(6) The Department of Transportation may prohibit the operation of electric personal assistive mobility devices on any road under its jurisdiction if it determines that such a prohibition is necessary in the interest of safety."

Thus, effective July 1, 2002, motorized scooters as defined by section 316.003(82), Florida Statutes, as amended, are expressly excluded from the definition of "motor vehicles" for purposes of Chapter 316, Florida Statutes. Accordingly, the provisions of that chapter that prescribe various equipment and safe driving requirements of motor vehicles are no longer applicable to "motorized scooters."

Moreover, the provisions relating to the operation of mopeds would not be applicable to "motorized scooters" since such scooters, which have no seat or saddle for a rider's use, do not fall within the definition of "mopeds" contained in section 316.003(77), Florida Statutes. Thus, such provisions as sections 316.208 and 316.2085, Florida Statutes, which set forth the responsibilities of persons operating a motorcycle or moped, or section 316.211, Florida Statutes, which prescribes the equipment for motorcycle and moped riders, are inapplicable to motorized scooters.[5] Similarly, the requirement of section 316.2068, Florida Statutes, as created by section 68, Chapter 02-20, Laws of Florida, imposing certain regulations on electric personal assistive mobility devices, apply only to such devices as defined in section 316.003(83), Florida Statutes, as amended. I would note, however, that the definition of "motor vehicle" contained in section 322.01(26), Florida Statutes, for purposes of that chapter relating to driver's licenses, has not been amended and still defines "motor vehicle" as "any self-propelled vehicle, including a motor vehicle combination, not operated upon rails or guideway, excluding vehicles moved solely by human power, motorized wheelchairs, and motorized bicycles as defined in s. 316.003."[6]

In light of the above, the Legislature may wish to readdress these issues and clarify its intent regarding the operation of motorized scooters in this state.

Accordingly, I am of the opinion that as of July 1, 2002, motorized scooters are excluded from the definition of "motor vehicle" for purposes of Chapter 316, Florida Statutes, and therefore are not subject to the equipment and safe driving requirements of a motor vehicle contained in that chapter, nor are the provisions relating to mopeds or "electric personal assistive mobility devices" prescribed in Chapter 316, Florida Statutes, applicable to motorized scooters.

Sincerely,

Robert A. Butterworth
Attorney General

 
FHP Station Address & Phone Numbers   |    Regional Communications Centers   |    Mission   |    A - Z Guide

Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | MyFlorida.com
Copyright ©2008 State of Florida