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Editorial: Florida Highway Patrol
Stealthy, sure, but wise?

Published in the Naples Daily News (12/11/04)

Troopers target aggressive drivers
Published in the Melbourne Florida Today (12/09/04)

Troopers in stealth cars too sneaky for their own good?
I can't see it

Published in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune (12/09/04)

Stealth cruisers too tame for aggressive drivers' good
Published in the Florida Times-Union (12/09/04)

FHP steps up fight against aggressive drivers
Published in the ABC7 News (12/08/04)

FHP to use stealth cars to curb bad driving
Published in the Ft. Myers News-Press (12/08/04)

FHP using unmarked Mercury Marauders to catch speeders
Published in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune(12/08/04)

FHP Using `Stealth' on Roads
Published in the Lakeland Ledger (12/08/04)

FHP's 'stealth' cars aim to slow down aggressive drivers
Published in the Miami Herald (12/07/04)

FHP Unveils Car To Catch Aggressive And Dangerous Drivers
Published in the WFTV News (12/07/04)

New Tool to Combat Aggressive Driving in Leon County
Published in the WCTV News (12/07/04)

FHP Hits the Road in Suped-up Marauders to Fight Road Rage
Published in the WJHG News (12/07/04)


Editorial: Florida Highway Patrol
Stealthy, sure, but wise?

When we heard the Florida Highway Patrol has a new weapon out there to combat aggressive driving, we thought it's about time the FHP sent out more patrol cars. A high profile by the FHP, plus other, local law-enforcement agencies, ought to have as much positive impact on deportment as it does on speed.

We thought. Until we heard what kind of vehicles the FHP has in mind.

Instead of marked cars with flashing lights on top the FHP is deploying 18 Mercury Marauders » muscle cars with regular-issue license plates and tinted windows.

Police lights are concealed behind the grill.

Imagine yourself being followed by one of those vehicles at night, especially in a strange neighborhood. How many drivers will be inclined to speed away or duck down a side street? They're likely to turn roads into even more of the "high-risk areas" that FHP says it is trying to settle.

We have another concern. These Marauders will be easy to mimic. There are some demented drivers out there who dream of impersonating police officers, and this will play into their hands.

Call us old-fashioned. We believe in the fundamental power of the traditional patrol car. Those who are doing wrong will right their ways instantly. Look at all those brake lights suddenly turn a glowing red when you see a patrol car up ahead. Those who are doing right will wave as they go by. Those in need of help will know which car to flag down.

Not so with a Mercury Marauder.

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Troopers target aggressive drivers

FHP will use unmarked car to find bad drivers

Tailgaters, chronic lane-hoppers and speeders beware: Florida Highway Patrol troopers in Brevard will have a new tool to catch you in the act.

It's an unmarked Mercury Marauder with a high-performance engine that officials say will be used to find and quickly catch aggressive drivers.

The silver car is part of a statewide distribution of 18 Marauders. The Marauders -- equipped with high-tech video and audio equipment to record drivers and their reactions after a traffic stop -- cost $40,000 each and were donated by an anonymous Florida resident.

"People tend to behave when they see a marked patrol car but then, when the officer is gone, they get back to tailgating," said Kim Miller, a spokeswoman for the Florida Highway Patrol.

"What we want to do with the unmarked unit is be in the right place at the right time. That means aggressive drivers are more likely to be caught."

The agency says aggressive driving is the chief complaint received on its *FHP hotline, a phone number set up for motorists to alert troopers to traffic problems. The agency's 22 troopers typically drive marked black and tan Camaros or Crown Victorias.

Three unmarked Crown Victorias are already used in monitoring Brevard's traffic, FHP officials said. Not all have cameras or the other specialized equipment in the Marauders.

Highway Patrol statistics show that from July 2003 to June 2004, troopers issued 8,779 citations for violations related to aggressive driving. State officials did not have a county-by-county breakdown. However, traffic statistics show that 672 people in Brevard were charged criminally with reckless driving last year.

Troopers define aggressive driving as a motorist committing at least two traffic violations at once, including tailgating, recklessly changing lanes, passing on the shoulder or speeding.

About the Marauder

Mercury began producing the Marauder in 2003 as a souped-up version of its parent company's Ford Crown Victoria. With luxury and sport options, and a 300-horsepower V8, it sells for more than $34,000. It was discontinued for the 2005 model year. Source: Car and Driver.

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Troopers in stealth cars too sneaky for their own good?
I can't see it

Columnist: Tom Lyons

The reaction to a supposedly new Highway Patrol tactic has been interesting.

At first, I was having a hard time seeing how anyone could seriously object -- whine, maybe, but not seriously object -- to Highway Patrol troopers driving stealth patrol cars.

The cars in question are Mercury Marauders, customized for troopers but not in any obviously visible way. They are even less noticeable than most unmarked but semi-spottable police cars.

We usually expect state troopers to be in cars so well marked that we can pick them out from the next county. Maybe we all have a slight tendency to prefer that, for all the wrong reasons.

I'm sure some people are sincerely unhappy when they get a ticket from a trooper driving a sporty, silver, totally civilian-looking car in the right lane, a car the speeder passed like it was a moped.

But people who get speeding tickets or are charged with reckless driving are rarely appreciative. Many are entertainingly prone to complain irrationally.

But they aren't the only ones less than thrilled with the stealth tactic. The AAA Auto Club South has expressed misgivings. So has a former prosecutor, David Haenel, who handled thousands of traffic cases.

A Herald-Tribune story quoted Haenal, who recently became a private defense attorney and makes representing traffic defendants a specialty.

His e-mail address might give you a clue: david@fightyourtickets.com.

Haenel called the very unmarked trooper cars "sneaky."

"It's very deceptive to an individual pulled over on I-75 in the middle of the night by a car with no markings," he said.

Sneaky? Deceptive? My response, as I told him, was: So what? The troopers aren't encouraging anyone to drive like an idiot. It isn't entrapment. So I see nothing wrong with cops going incognito and driving the speed limit, and then popping anyone who looks like a blur going by in the passing lane, I told him.

Haenel's answer surprised me. He said his point was not that there is anything improper about it, or unfair. He isn't planning to fight tickets based on any such argument.

That tactic is just a bad idea and unsafe, he thinks, even if it catches more dangerous drivers or makes more drivers slow down, which he says is doubtful.

When stopped by a car that looks so much like a civilian car -- aside from the flashing lights on the dashboard -- some drivers are going to seriously wonder if it is a real trooper or an imposter, he said. That means some will be tense and unsure whether to cooperate.

That should be the last thing a trooper wants. It would be a safety issue for everyone involved, he says.

Well, now I see what he means, and it is a reasonable point. But I'm not convinced.

These cars aren't that different from unmarked cars used by many police agencies for many years. And luckily, instances of fake cops doing traffic stops are so exceedingly rare that there is virtually no reason for anyone to have such a thought.

So the worry is very theoretical. If troopers expected such a problem, they wouldn't want the risk. And yet, with few stealth cars available, troopers are assigned them as a reward for good work, and are glad to get them.

Unless real evidence of a problem surfaces, I plan to stay glad along with the stealthy troopers.

Think how often you've been on the interstate with no cop in sight when some jerk acting out his NASCAR delusions has shot by, and you wished a trooper was there.

Now, one just might be.

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Stealth cruisers too tame for aggressive drivers' good

State troopers will man two of the cars in the Jacksonville area to curb driving gripes.

Speed-shifting, bumper-drafting, lane-changing, thrill-seeking drivers whose highway stunts put others in danger just became the target of a new stable of covert Florida Highway Patrol cruisers.

Two of the 18 specially equipped Mercury Marauders going in use statewide are deployed in Jacksonville, where troopers will search for aggressive drivers using stealth and high-definition digital video cameras to target, record and ticket violators.

"We get more complaints about people driving aggressively than any other thing," Highway Patrol Lt. Bill Leeper said. "Last year we issued almost 9,000 citations for aggressive driving statewide."

The cars, with emergency lights hidden behind grills, nondescript license plates and chrome rims, will look as much like a family sedan as a family sedan, Leeper said.

Aggressive drivers who naturally are watching for marked cars could be surprised.

"That car they just cut off might be a trooper," Leeper said.

Aggressive drivers are classified as those who commit a combination of two or more violations such as speeding, weaving in and out of traffic, tailgating, passing in emergency lanes, and flashing headlights to move traffic.

When a special "driving aggressively" box on the traffic citation form is checked by the trooper, a judge hearing the case will be able to impose a $500 fine for the violation, Leeper said.

Leeper said the corporate donor who gave the Mercurys to the state has asked to remain anonymous. Fully equipped for the new purpose, the cars cost about $40,000 each and will reach 150 mph, he said.

The two cars in the Jacksonville-based Highway Patrol district in Northeast Florida will be stationed with the troop permanently. Troopers who have shown an interest in stopping aggressive drivers were assigned to the cars that primarily will patrol interstate highways.

To boost the strength of evidence against a driver, the cruisers are equipped with digital recorders to capture the driver's actions prior to being stopped, Leeper said.

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FHP steps up fight against aggressive drivers

LEE COUNTY» Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Jeff Rongish is one of 18 troopers in the state picked to drive the latest weapon in the fight against aggressive drivers. The 2005 Mercury Marauders are designed to be completely covert so troopers can get aggressive drivers off the road.

The cars are equipped with the latest technology.

"Overall it is a faster vehicle, it's got more horsepower and more capabilities than the Crown Victoria," said Rongish.

Rongish is one of 18 drivers hand picked to drive one of the covert cars.

"We don't want to be seen out on the roadways - until we're ready to be seen," said Rongish.

ABC7 went along as Rongish took the car on I-75 for the first time.

The camera is top of the line. It is also built into the passenger seat, instead of on the dashboard, so it won't interfere with air bags.

"One of the unique features about this particular camera is that most of it is integrated into the passenger seat," said Rongish.

The vehicles were provided by an anonymous donor. All of the troopers driving the cars were carefully selected by commanders.

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FHP to use stealth cars to curb bad driving

Vehicles have hidden lights, tinted windows

TALLAHASSEE » The Florida Highway Patrol has unveiled its newest weapon in cracking down on aggressive driving: 18 unmarked "stealth" cars ready to pursue speeders across the state.

The high-performance Mercury Marauders are unmarked and come complete with regular-issue license plates. Their police lights are hidden behind the front grilles and their windows are tinted, obscuring the uniformed trooper inside.

One of the new vehicles has been assigned to Southwest Florida, where it will assist in the patrol of Interstate 75 and state highways, said FHP Lt. Vincent Crawford. There are no immediate plans to add additional Marauders to Lee or Collier counties, he said.

"It's a vehicle most people aren't going to take for a police car," Crawford said.

The stealth car begins patrolling as Lee County reached 100 traffic fatalities in 2004 on Tuesday, the third time in four years that has happened.

FHP chief Col. Chris Knight said aggressive drivers "are turning our highways into high-risk arenas." The department gets more complaints about aggressive driving » drivers who commit two or more moving violations simultaneously, such as speeding and weaving in and out of traffic » than any other subject.

From July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2004, there were nearly 8,800 citations issued for aggressive driving statewide.

During a pilot program using three Marauders in Broward and Palm Beach counties through Oct. 31, the department issued more than 700 citations. Troopers received training on how to operate the vehicle and its gadgets last week.

The cars are equipped with high-definition digital video and an infrared camera, backing up troopers when they confront aggressive drivers. They also come with lasers to track speeders and special lighting, Crawford said.

Broward Trooper Gary Slayton, who has been in a pilot project with the Marauder, said even in heavy traffic "we are seeing drivers running 100, 110 miles an hour."

The vehicles were donated by a benefactor who wants to remain anonymous, FHP spokesman Maj. Ernesto Duarte said.

Assigning 18 troopers to the job is "the largest effort at combating aggressive driving in the Florida Highway Patrol's history," said Kevin Guidry, an FHP bureau chief in charge of the program.

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FHP using unmarked Mercury Marauders to catch speeders

SARASOTA COUNTY » Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Richard Weaver's Mercury Marauder, with its silver paint and shiny 18-inch rims, doesn't look at all like a cop car.

Chances are, a speeding driver won't even notice Weaver until he sees the flashing lights in his rearview mirror. Weaver, a member of the state's stealth patrol, wrote his first traffic ticket to a guy who drove right past him at about 90 mph, weaving through traffic. "He was shocked," Weaver said.

The stealth patrol is a team of 18 troopers driving unmarked Mercury Marauders that began roving the state's roadways this week.

The Marauders fit in well with the big, luxury cars driven by thousands of people on Florida's highways. Few drivers will be able to tell if they're passing one of the souped-up sedans.

And that's just the point » FHP is hoping that word will spread about state troopers who are almost impossible for a speeding driver to spot.

"If everybody hears about a granny car with nice rims, then I guess we've done our job," said Weaver.

The cars have already led to more tickets in Broward County, where two Marauders have been ticketing speeders for the past year as a test of the program. From January to October, the Marauders handed out nearly 5,000 citations.

FHP officials insist that the "stealth" cars will reduce the number of traffic fatalities, and aren't about handing out more tickets.

Defense lawyers aren't so sure.

The Marauders are "clearly sneaky," said Sarasota defense attorney David Haenel, who handles lots of traffic cases.

"It's very deceptive to an individual pulled over on I-75 in the middle of the night by a car with no markings," said Haenel, a former prosecutor.

Undercover cars are nothing new in Sarasota County, which is already patrolled by unmarked sheriff's vehicles.

The Marauder is even harder to spot, and more powerful.

"Basically, they took the motor out of a Cobra Mustang and stuck it in a Mercury Grand Marquis," said Dennis Reinhart, whose automotive shop in Orange Park added a "high-speed metal matrix drive shaft" to increase the car's top speed from 128 mph to more than 140 mph.

The cars also have digital radars and an infared camera.

All 18 of the $31,000 cars were paid for and donated by an anonymous benefactor, said a Highway Patrol spokesperson.

Trooper Weaver said he hopes the Marauder will stop erratic drivers who bother people who are just trying to get to work safely.

"They're in the middle of a race, and they don't realize it," he said.

The trooper spent last weekend training in how to use the car, doing exercises like driving the Marauder into a wet intersection and making a quick 90-degree turn.

When he's out on Interstate 75, Weaver said he'll be in the righthand lane, driving the speed limit and letting fast drivers go by before accelerating to pull them over.

A supervisor at the AAA Auto Club South said that his organization prefers marked cars over unmarked.

"Anything that we or the authorities can do to make our roadways safer is wonderful," said Alan Carter, the auto club's district manager for Sarasota County. "The typical driver probably doesn't have nice things to say about unmarked patrol cars, but they get the job done."

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FHP Using `Stealth' on Roads

TALLAHASSEE -- The Florida Highway Patrol has unveiled its newest weapon in cracking down on aggressive driving: 18 unmarked "stealth" cars ready to pursue speeders across the state.

The high-performance Mercury Marauders are completely unmarked, complete with regularissue license plates. Their police lights are hidden behind the front grilles and their windows are tinted, obscuring the uniformed trooper inside.

FHP chief Col. Chris Knight said aggressive drivers "are turning our highways into high-risk arenas." The department gets more complaints about aggressive driving -- drivers who commit two or more moving violations simultaneously, such as speeding and weaving in and out of traffic -- than any other subject.

From July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2004, nearly 8,800 citations were issued for aggressive driving statewide.

During a pilot program using three Marauders in Broward and Palm Beach counties through Oct. 31, the department issued more than 700 citations.

Broward Trooper Gary Slayton, who has been in a pilot project with the Marauder, said even in heavy traffic "we are seeing drivers running 100, 110 miles an hour."

The vehicles were donated by a benefactor who wants to remain anonymous, FHP spokesman Maj. Ernesto Duarte said.

Assigning 18 troopers to the job is "the largest effort at combating aggressive driving in the Florida Highway Patrol's history," said Kevin Guidry, an FHP bureau chief in charge of the program.

The cars are equipped with high-definition digital video and an infrared camera, backing up troopers when they confront aggressive drivers.

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FHP's 'stealth' cars aim to slow down aggressive drivers

TALLAHASSEE - One of the best things Miami FHP Trooper Mike Transue's new car has going for it is that it looks like a lot of other cars you'd find in a condo parking lot.

The Florida Highway Patrol rolled out its newest weapon in the fight against aggressive driving Monday: 18 new ''stealth'' cars, high-performance Mercury Marauders. A third of them will be assigned to South Florida.

They are totally unmarked, even down to the regular-issue license plates. Their police lights are hidden behind the front grilles. They have chrome rims, and their windows are tinted, making it difficult to see the uniformed trooper inside.

Aggressive drivers ''are turning our highways into high-risk arenas,'' FHP chief Col. Chris Knight said. The department gets more complaints about aggressive driving -- drivers who commit two or more moving violations simultaneously, such as speeding and weaving in and out of traffic -- than any other subject. The department issued more than 700 citations in Broward and Palm Beach counties through Oct. 31 in an aggressive driving pilot program using three Marauders.

From July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2004, there were nearly 8,800 citations for aggressive driving statewide.

Even in heavy traffic, said Broward Trooper Gary Slayton, who has been in a pilot project with the Marauder, ''We are seeing drivers running 100, 110 miles an hour.'' They speed, recklessly darting in and out of lanes, tailgating, passing in the emergency lanes and flashing their lights at cars in front of them.

The Marauders were donated by a benefactor who wants to remain anonymous, FHP spokesman Maj. Ernesto Duarte said.

Assigning 18 troopers to the job is ''the largest effort at combating aggressive driving in the Florida Highway Patrol's history,'' added Kevin Guidry, an FHP bureau chief in charge of the program.

The cockpit of Transue's Marauder is packed with radios and other electronics.

Go screaming past him and you'll be picked up on high-definition digital video and on radar pointing both forward and backward. Inside the car there is an infrared camera, so it's no longer the trooper's word against the driver.

''When you have the camera, they can't dispute it,'' Transue said.

When Transue hits the gas, he'll catch up faster than ever. And when he hits the dual sirens, the noise is louder.

Speed from a modified 302-horsepower engine is important. Instead of Transue taking a mile to catch somebody, he said he might catch them in a quarter of a mile.

''The faster I can catch up to that person and get him stopped, the safer it is for everybody,'' he said.

The Marauder's power is not only under the hood; it's also in what it does in the mind of the miscreant. It creates a fear of the unknown.

''If they don't see you, they don't fear you, and they own the roadway,'' Broward FHP Trooper Tony Lee explained.

``Because it is a Marauder and there are more Marauders on the roadway now, you really don't know whether it is a police car or not, Lee said.''

Ten years ago, if a trooper caught one speeder a week going more than 100 mph, it was a big deal.

On a typical midnight shift, Transue said, he gets ''two, three cars a night doing 100 or more.'' One night not long ago, he caught a car going 146 mph.

''People who are driving aggressively are focused on only one thing, getting to where they are going no matter how they get there,'' Transue said.

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FHP Unveils Car To Catch Aggressive And Dangerous Drivers

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- The Florida Highway Patrol has unveiled its newest weapon in cracking down on aggressive driving: 18 unmarked "stealth" cars ready to pursue speeders across the state.

The high-performance Mercury Marauders are completely unmarked, complete with regular-issue license plates. Their police lights are hidden behind the front grilles and their windows are tinted, obscuring the uniformed trooper inside.

FHP chief Col. Chris Knight said aggressive drivers "are turning our highways into high-risk arenas." The department gets more complaints about aggressive driving -- drivers who commit two or more moving violations simultaneously, such as speeding and weaving in and out of traffic -- than any other subject.

From July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2004, there were nearly 8,800 citations for aggressive driving statewide.

During a pilot program using three Marauders in Broward and Palm Beach counties through Oct. 31, the department issued more than 700 citations.

Broward Trooper Gary Slayton, who has been in a pilot project with the Marauder, said even in heavy traffic "we are seeing drivers running 100, 110 miles an hour."

The vehicles were donated by a benefactor who wants to remain anonymous, FHP spokesman Maj. Ernesto Duarte said.

Assigning 18 troopers to the job is "the largest effort at combating aggressive driving in the Florida Highway Patrol's history," said Kevin Guidry, an FHP bureau chief in charge of the program.

The cars are equipped with high-definition digital video and an infrared camera, backing up troopers when they confront aggressive drivers.

"When you have the camera, they can't dispute it," said FHP Trooper Mike Transue.

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New Tool to Combat Aggressive Driving in Leon County

Aggressive driving is on the rise in the Sunshine State, and the Florida Highway Patrol says it's killing more people than drunk drivers. FHP has a new plan in place that will help take aggressive drivers off the roads.

If you're an aggressive Florida driver, there are 18 new reasons to get a new attitude when you're behind the wheel.

Trooper Michael Transue with the Florida Highway Patrol says, "It's going to help us catch these aggressive drivers. When you're in a marked car, they have the chance to see you coming."

With these new Mercury Marauders, FHP troopers say it's time to be aggressive, but they're talking about themselves, not you.

COL Chris Knight adds, "It's a high performance vehicle and it can go much faster than our Camaros. It has radar and video, and has all the bells and whistles if you will."

FHP says that aggressive driving is now killing more people in Florida than drunk drivers.

Knight says, "It's becoming a bigger problem on a daily basis. The state is growing and the number of impatient drivers has forced the state to react."

The black, silver or maroon vehicles will be found mainly in urban areas, and as of yet, not in Tallahassee.

LT John Bagnardi says, "The word out there for Tallahassee residents is if you're going to travel in Florida, don't get caught up that road rage. It doesn't matter if you're from Tallahassee, we'll catch you."

FHP warns if you're behind the wheel and experience a fit of road rage, calm down or you might find yourself behind bars. The vehicles were donated to FHP by someone who wishes to remain anonymous. The vehicles are now on the roads.

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FHP Hits the Road in Suped-up Marauders to Fight Road Rage

This time of year can be especially stressful on the roads as you race around trying to get everything done in time for the holidays, but the results can be deadly.

The Florida Highway Patrol is using a brand new tool this month to fight road rage and aggressive driving, and you probably won't even see it coming.

Trooper Roger Thomas has seen it all in his three years patrolling Florida's highways.

"Excessive speed, following too closely, unsafe lane changes."

But now he'll be able to fight back with the element of surprise. Trooper Thomas is slipping behind the wheel of one of 18 new unmarked, high-performance Mercury Marauders.

The Marauders will patrol the state's most heavily traveled highways, looking for aggressive drivers and trying to stop road rage before it's too late.

Col. Chris Knight of the FHP says to buckle up.

"It's mainly our urban areas where you got all the traffic and people become impatient. They've got to get from point A to point B and don't leave themselves enough time."

Trooper Thomas remembers one case where that frustration turned deadly.

"The guy was following him too closely and the guy pulled up along side of him, on the inside lane, told him to pull over. He pulled over and the guy shot him like two times right in front of his daughter."

The Florida Highway Patrol has been aggressively pursuing aggressive drivers, writing 38 percent more citations this year than last, but prosecution is inconsistent. That's where the Marauders come in.

The Marauders are equipped with state-of-the-art video and audio equipment. A cruise cam records the reckless driving, so there's no dispute when the case comes before a judge, and since they're unmarked, you won't know if that sedan you just cut off is a trooper.

The 18 Marauders were paid for by a donor who wishes to remain anonymous. They're valued at about $40,000 apiece.

The Marauders will be deployed to the following cities/counties:

1 in Gainesville
2 in Jacksonville
3 in Orlando
1 in Brevard
1 in Pinellas
1 in Tampa
1 in Venice
1 in Ft. Myers
3 in Miami
3 in Davie
1 in Lantana

Notice there are not any of the special cars assigned to anywhere in northwest Florida, at least not at this time.

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FHP Unveils Latest Stealth Vehicle

 

 
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